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Working Papers or "Veniam Pro Laudo Peto"
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Finished

Saturday, December 30, 2006
This will be my last posting on this blog. It has been so difficult to manage this large of a blog and I would prefer to close this out. To begin anew. I enjoy writing even in this format I have found too much to stop--which I tried for months. So, I begin the new blog with the link posted here. Not sure what direction it will take and then again in life we are never quite sure what direction HE will take us in next. I will go back to this blog over the next few days and clear up some typos and character errors on about three or four previous posts which I just published to get them out and done. Besides that this blog is closed.
Keep me in your prayers.
God bless you!
In His Merciful Heart,
E.
  • |
    12/30/2006 04:17:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    Murder in the Cathedral

    Friday, October 20, 2006
    "God's law does not reduce, much less do away with human freedom; rather, it protects and promotes that freedom. In contrast, however, some present-day cultural tendencies have given rise to several currents of thought in ethics which centre upon an alleged conflict between freedom and law. These doctrines would grant to individuals or social groups the right to determine what is good or evil. Human freedom would thus be able to "create values" and would enjoy a primacy over truth, to the point that truth itself would be considered a creation of freedom. Freedom would thus lay claim to a moral autonomy which would actually amount to an absolute sovereignty."[1]
    In T.S. Eliot's "Murder in the Cathedral" this reader is convinced that the driving force behind the murder of the Archbishop was the evil known today as politically correctness taken to it radical extreme. In his apologia the second Knight makes the comment "No one regrets for violence more than we do. Unhappily, there are times when violence is the only way in which social justice can be secured."
    [2] As Eliot eludes to unless motives are grounded in Love and Truth, which ultimately are from God, mankind in trying to serve the god of human respect and political correctness will always fold in upon it’s plan ending in evil. For as long as mankind tries to justify itself in relation to other created beings and not the Creator, Who is Love and Truth, chaos will most always ensue as actions and choices are taken to their historic and logical culmination. To make matters worse in an vain attempt to cast off the blame of their murderous action the killers, as many in society currently, on to others in the statement "We have been instrumental in bringing about the state of affairs that you approve"[3]. Thus lacking the integrity to be responsible for their own actions. This is not surprising though as moral integrity is a hallmark trait of the disciple of Jesus Christ which these murders were not though they may have played lip service to the name Christian for personal gain or prestige.
    In an interesting contrast to the motives and actions of the killers this reader noticed that the Archbishop relied heavily, as he should, from the Lucan passage regarding persecution
    [4] and the instructions of Our Lord.
    The killers go on to vainly justify their actions like children would say 'he made me mad so he made me do it' in the statements "He used every means of provocation; from his conduct...".
    [5] They go on further with the ludicrous statement "...when he had deliberately exasperated us beyond human endurance....he could have kept himself from us long enough to allow our righteous anger to cool. That was just what he did not wish to happen, he insisted, while we were still inflamed with wrath."[6] Thus the logic of evil falls apart in the 'justification' of said evil action to one of a childlike excuse and devaluating proposed logic their actions through their own words. Sin and evil are rightfully referred to as things which pull the soul down to a lesser dignity than the Lord God of Hosts created us to live in. The decisions and resulting action of the Archbishop's murders and their banal attempt for justification show, at least, to this reader a example in literary prose of the evil conclusion of moral relativism in which truth is only relevant to the individual and there are no moral absolutes. The same justification used by the murders of the Archbishop in "Murder in the Cathedral" was used by the Nazi's to exterminate human beings and is used today by 'modern and intelligent society' to "justify" the slaughter of millions of innocents in abortion and euthanasia. Evil is justified for a common social 'good' and then hidden in the dark recesses of excuses citing the betterment of a society or class rather than the dignity of the human person. Thus, the Archbishop is dead as are countless millions who question the Divine Truth over individual desires. Rather than allowing Divine Truth reigning supreme the killers in Eliot's play and society today choose to serve a lesser god of relativism and selfish desire.
    The clarion call of the killers is similar to that of society which values the imperfect and temporary justice of man over the perfect and eternal Justice of God. In their Confiteor the killers echo the words of society. For we value, many times, the feeble opinions of man over the eternal Wisdom of Almighty God.
    "Forgive us, O Lord, we acknowledge ourselves as type of the common man, of the men and women who shut the door and sit by the fire; who fear the blessing of God, the loneliness of the night of God, the surrender required, the deprivation inflicted; WHO FEAR THE INJUSTICE OF MEN LESS THAN THE JUSTICE OF GOD...."
    [7]
    Possibly the killers and society today would be much better served to go back to the words of the 4th century Ambrosian hymn, the "Te Deum", which was sung during the final scene in Eliot's play and pay close attention to it's words for we ultimately answer to God and must beg for His Mercy and help to follow He who is Truth
    [8].
    "O God, we praise Thee, and acknowledge Thee to be the supreme Lord.Everlasting Father, all the earth worships Thee.All the Angels, the heavens and all angelic powers,All the Cherubim and Seraphim, continuously cry to Thee:Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts!Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of Thy glory.The glorious choir of the Apostles,The wonderful company of Prophets,The white-robed army of Martyrs, praise Thee.Holy Church throughout the world acknowledges Thee:The Father of infinite Majesty;Thy adorable, true and only Son;Also the Holy Spirit, the Comforter.O Christ, Thou art the King of glory!Thou art the everlasting Son of the Father.When Thou tookest it upon Thyself to deliver man,Thou didst not disdain the Virgin's womb.Having overcome the sting of death, Thou opened the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.Thou sitest at the right hand of God in the glory of the Father.We believe that Thou willst come to be our Judge.We, therefore, beg Thee to help Thy servants whom Thou hast redeemed with Thy Precious Blood.Let them be numbered with Thy Saints in everlasting glory.V. Save Thy people, O Lord, and bless Thy inheritance!R. Govern them, and raise them up forever.V. Every day we thank Thee.R. And we praise Thy Name forever, yes, forever and ever.V. O Lord, deign to keep us from sin this day.R. Have mercy on us, O Lord, have mercy on us.V. Let Thy mercy, O Lord, be upon us, for we have hoped in Thee.R. O Lord, in Thee I have put my trust; let me never be put to shame."
    [9]
    [1] "Veritas Splendor"("The Splendor of Truth"), Pope John Paul II, Rome, 1993
    [2] "Murder in the Cathedral", T.S. Eliot, Harcourt, London, 1935
    [3] Eliot, page 82
    [4] Lk 21:12-19
    [5] Eliot, page 83
    [6] Ibid
    [7] Ibid, page 87-88
    [8] Jn 14:6
    [9] "Te Deum laudamus", 4th Century A.D., attributed St. Nicetas and St Ambrose.
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:33:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    “Just As I Am”

    “Although I am free in regard to all, I have made myself a slave to all so to win over as many as possible”[1]

    In reading “Just As I Am” by Dr. Billy Graham what strikes this reader is that Graham has become a slave to all for the sake of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and how the Lord Jesus used Graham as His Instrument. There can be no mistake that the Lord God has and continues to use Graham to act as an agent of Divine Mercy to a world which so desperately needs the Merciful Hand of God.
    One of the things that impressed me was how Graham prepared the way spiritually far in advance of a potential crusade in order to open the right doors and soften hearts. In speaking of his desire to go to India[2] Graham writes “…I had prayed that someday God might open the door for us to go there”. Graham knew then as he does today the importance of spiritual preparation prior to any work that God calls us to do in order to be more effective. Like Nehemiah[3] from Biblical times Graham used prayer as an effective weapon to change the hearts of those he was about to meet with. It is God who can change the hearts and minds of people not a effective preaching style or even a virtuous life however through the Lord God of Hosts hearts and minds can be softened and changed so that He can use us in a manner which brings Him glory and honor and thus souls are won for the King.
    “Blessed are the peacemakers for they will be called children of God”.[4] I also saw from Graham’s book that despite the misconception between well intentioned Protestants and Catholics that both can work together effectively for the greater glory of God so to win souls. Far too often we get bogged down on items that while they may be important take our focus away from proclaiming Jesus Christ Crucified and Risen to the farthest corners of the world. Graham writes about his experience working with Catholic Christians that “ [it] taught me that most people were not going to take us seriously if we spent all our time debating our differences instead of uniting at the Cross”.[5] He writes prior to that statement that “Protestants and Catholics- were slowly growing in our understanding of each other and of our mutual commitment to those teachings we hold in common”.[6] One of the oldest tactics in warfare is the concept of divide and conquer and the father of all lies being a excellent and intelligent tactician tries to ensnare well intentioned Christians into backbiting and inter-religious infighting in order to take our focus of proclaiming the Gospel of Jesus Christ thereby endangering not only the souls of others but our own souls also in pulling us into the pit of hatred and darkness. Graham as most faithful Christian leaders know that at this critical junction in the history of humankind that all Christians must keep their focus upon the Cross of the Crucified One. Souls depend upon each of us rising above self and looking to the Cross and proclaiming with loud united voices that the only hope for the world and for individual souls comes from Our Lord Jesus Christ.
    It came to me in prayer recently that God uses the ordinary events and circumstances in our lives to manifest His infinite power and glory. It is in those ordinary coincidences of life that God working through a soul(s) can be transformed into extraordinary opportunities of grace and blessing. Only God can take the countless seemingly meaningless encounters in our day and create them to better serve Him. One such example in “Just As I Am” that I can quickly recall is the story of when Graham was at the Urbana Missions Conference and suffered a life threatening thrombophlebitis[7]. A medical student just happened to be right there who quickly ascertained the danger and helped Graham receive the life saving help he needed. God planted that young medical student in that place at that time to serve His glory. The story continues though as the medical student later becomes even a better physician by going to the Mayo Clinic for advanced studies and so again the world has a better physician who can act as an instrument of God’s healing power to a hurting world. A chance encounter between two souls on fire for the Lord Jesus and now I can only imagine the number of spiritual and physical healings that have taken place because these two men allowed God to take the ordinary and make it extra ordinary. The other encounter of note is that of the encounters between John Foster Dulles and Graham. While lives and souls benefited then and now from the obvious encounters they had it is interesting to note that the young Avery Dulles did go on to a vocation as a Jesuit priest and years later was created cardinal by Pope John Paul II and is recognized as one of the greatest Christian theological minds alive today. These are but a few of the many chance encounters where God is allowed to work and souls are transformed through His grace. In the book “The Practice of the Presence of God” there is a quote from a conversation with Brother Lawrence which I feel is fitting to shine further light upon the subject of how God is glorified through the ordinary events of our lives.
    “That relying on the infinite merits of Our Lord, we should, with complete confidence, ask for His grace regardless of our sins, that God never failed to grant us His grace in each action; that he [Brother Lawrence] perceived this clearly and never failed to do so unless he was distracted from the presence of God, or he had forgotten to ask Him for His aid. That in time of doubt God never failed to enlighten us when we had no other purpose but to please Him and act for His love. That our sanctification depended not upon changing our works but in doing for God what we ordinarily do for ourselves. That it was a pitty to see how many people always mistake the means for the end, attaching great importance to certain works that they do very imperfectly for reasons of human respect. That he found the best way of reaching God was by doing ordinary tasks, which he was obligated to perform under obedience, entirely for the love of God and not for the human attitude towards them.”[8]
    In trying to quickly answer the question posed is ‘Just as I am’ a Christian classic I would say that as far as contemporary Christian literature goes then yes the book would certainly qualify. If the book meets the test of time and the discerning eyes of future generations would be a question best posed to The One Whom is outside time and knows the future. I would say that it has many of the characteristics of a potential classic in Christian literature but will let time play itself out to determine the fate of the book. We can only hope that other generations find the book to be one of inspiration and grace as I did.
    In closing this reader found it interesting that Graham, and I dare say most Christian leaders would agree, stated that one of his regrets was to not grow closer to Christ in the time he was allotted in life. All the sermons, works and numerous conversions through Graham and other Christian leaders and we come back to the central focus of why we are created—to love and serve the Lord in this life so as to be with Him in the next. If a important Christian leader like Graham can have the devotion and the humility to state that the most important aspect of our lives is to draw close and be conformed to the Crucified One then all of us should take notice and follow his wise words. God is love and all the works even those of God are in vain if we do not put on Christ daily and draw closer into His Heart burning with love.
    “If I speak in human and angelic tongues but do not have love, I am a resounding gong or a clashing cymbal. And if I have the gift of prophecy and comprehend all mysteries and knowledge, if I have all faith so as to move mountains but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give away over everything I own, and if I hand my body over so that I may boast but do not have love, I gain nothing…..When I was a child, I used to talk as a child, think as a child, reason as a child; when I became a man I put aside childish things…..but the greatest of these is love.”[9]
    [1] 1 Cor 9:19
    [2] Page 264, “Just As I Am”, Billy Graham, Harper, San Francisco, 1997
    [3] Neh 1:5-2:9
    [4] Mt 5:9
    [5] Ibid, p. 273
    [6] Ibid, p. 273
    [7] Ibid, p. 424-425
    [8] Page 38, “The Practice of the Presence of God”, Brother Lawrence of the Resurrection, Image/ Doubleday, New York
    [9] 1 Cor 13:1-13
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:31:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    Saint Augustine

    Saint Augustine focuses Book II of his “Confessions” with a humble examination of his past life prior to his Augustine draws on the critical element of self knowledge and through that examination the acknowledgment of his own sinfulness. Before Divine Light can permeate the intellect the soul must first gain a healthy fear of the Lord for it is only through knowledge of our sins and imperfections in contrast to His eternal perfection that we can hope to be infused with Light. The exact nature I feel of Augustine’s sins for the reader today (or even then) are not as important, I feel, as the fact that he openly examined his conscience and realizing his unworthiness confessed his sins and failings and begged God for His Mercy.
    I found it interesting that Augustine several times brings to bear that it was not God who left his side but Augustine who turned and rebelled from the Holy One. Augustine at one point refers to knots that he has tied through the years. I find that so interesting for in the past few years since my own re-conversion I too have discovered so many ‘knots of rebellion’ that I tied. The God of Love and Mercy can untie all those knots and can create the earth (the soul) anew despite the entanglements we acquire. I think though that God does not nor, I dare say, can not untie those knots of rebellion in the soul who freely chooses the other rather than He. I feel this is the case for God will not take away free will because of His Infinite Justice. Like Augustine and so many who have strayed God waits for the soul to turn to Him, even slightly, so that He may forgive and heal the soul. God never leaves and never stops loving each of us though we can leave His Grace through our own sins. Yet, like He did with Augustine, He waits and allows us to tie ourselves in knots knowing that in time we will cry out for Divine Mercy.
    Augustine goes on in Books XII and XIII to speak of the creation story. My personal view is that Augustine focused on this primarily as he was now, having confessed his sins and received Divine Mercy, a new creation. In Book III of “Imitation of Christ” Thomas a’ Kempis has a prayer for the enlightenment of the mind which part of it is fitting here. “Command the winds and storms, say to the sea, ‘Be still’; and to the north wind, ‘Blow not’; and a great calm shall ensue. Send forth Thy light and Thy truth, that they may shine upon the earth; for I am as the earth that is empty and void, until Thou enlighten me. Pour forth Thy grace from above. Water my heart with the dew of Heaven. Send down the waters of devotion to wash the face of the earth, to bring forth good and perfect fruit.”
    It is quite natural that Augustine who was created anew through the mercy of God would focus so heavily on the creation story. I can only imagine that after reflecting upon his conversion and the previous years of rebellion that Augustine’s mind now infused with Divine Grace was in a state of awe at the opus Dei within his life. We like Augustine merit nothing but a sure punishment for our sins and evil ways yet to the soul who confesses and begs for mercy He washes away our tears, heals our wounds, unties our knots and brings us into His banquet of love. God did great things with and through Augustine because Augustine rebuked his own selfish pride (he died to self) and thereby it was through his weakness that God was strongest. A lesson I feel I need to take from Augustine is that I should not trust in my own ability for “I am as the earth” but in The One who grants “abundant life”.
    Augustine uses the phrase in his ‘Confessions’ which I feel applies not only to him but to myself and so many of us who discover the God of Love and his mission for each of us- “Late have I loved Thee”. It is the realization that despite our own rebellion and wanderings of various sorts that He has always been there loving us, waiting for us and in many souls as Francis Thompson writes in the poem “The Hound of Heaven”- He pursues us tirelessly. “…’All which I took from thee I did but take, not for thy harms, but just that thou might’st seek it in My arms. All of which thy child’s mistake fancies as lost, I have stored for thee at home: rise, clasp my hand, and come!’ Halts by me that footfall: is my gloom after all, shade of His hand outstretched caressingly! ‘Ah, fondest, blindest, weakest, I am He Whom thou seekest! Thou dravest love from thee, who dravest Me.” I wonder if Augustine would have become such a great Saint of God had he not seen his own depravity and been allowed to venture into the darkness so that when the caught by the Hound of Heaven he could appreciate the Light even more and serve Him better. Like Augustine did in his ‘Confessions’ if we humble ourselves and stoop beneath the mighty Hand of God then He Himself will lift us up and create us anew.
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:29:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    “Spiritual Leadership”

    Interpretation of the 10 Principles from Chapter 12 of “Spiritual Leadership” by J. Oswald Sanders with Biblical and Non Biblical References.


    I. The Biblical writer Qoheleth writes in Chapter 3 of Ecclesiastes that “there is and appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heavens, a time to be born and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to uproot the plant….”[1] The first principle that I feel that Sanders gives the reader of his chapter on “The Leader and Time” is that the leader and in fact each Christian must understand the brevity and the gift of time. We are created for eternity and the choices we make to live in His love and follow His Will in the allotted time that we are given determine the destination of ourselves and other when we pass beyond the door of our earthly life into eternity. Because time is a gift given to the soul by God to be used prudently for the building of the Kingdom and to aid in the continual conversion of and sanctification of our souls we must take advantage of this short time we have. St James[2] refers to the sin of presumption[3] in speaking of people who assume they have many days or years yet squander the gift of time today and endanger their soul[4]. An understanding of time as a gift which is passing quickly[5] and shall not be repeated will aid the leader in more effective time management there by making them through God’s grace a more productive disciple for His Kingdom.
    II. Sanders indicates that the leader must ‘carefully select priorities’ to more effectively break open this gift of allotted time that we have been given and there by bear more fruit for our Divine Sovereign. This can be accomplished in several methods by setting and revising short, medium and long range objectives to correspond with an updated ‘to do list’. In 2nd Chronicles 29 we see the prophet Nathan and others giving a set of priorities which needed to be fulfilled. Furthermore, in Nehemiah[6] we see a well organized man of God setting priorities to better meet the objective. In leadership and in so many other areas in setting priorities to better maximize our time we need to remember the old maxim to “pick and choose our battles”. There will always be battles and important tasks needed to be met by the leader the key in setting priorities is to use the gift of discernment and pray for the grace to choose our tasks and battles in priority setting.
    III., IV., V. Sanders goes on to give three additional principles in time management for the God centered leader which are strategic steps, measured steps and never being hurried. The example in the Bible of strategic and measured planning comes from the prophet Ezekiel[7] and others. God is clearly very logical in his Divine Will for us and in following His Will we too must carefully, prayerfully and strategically plan so as to insure we are maximizing our time and talents for His greater glory. The concept of never being hurried has a variety of reasons for being important which would be from maximizing productivity—which in this case in souls for the King of Kings[8]. It would also aid in increasing usable time for other priorities, decreasing stress, increasing enjoyment and maximizing quality. While we will all face times of great stress, suffering[9] and anxiety[10] we need not create an environment which increases these thing which can lead us and others away from God. As Sanders points out in reference to the text of the wedding feast at Cana passage[11] even Our Lord Himself knew the importance of not hurrying the Divine Plan and so too we must. I borrow again from an old idiom to close this selection of principles in the words “haste makes waste”[12].
    VI. This is a good point to bring up the next principle which Sanders discusses being the submission to the Divine Will. The Father in His infinite Wisdom and Love has a clear plan for the sanctification of our souls, those around us and to meet the temporal needs of His children who live within His Divine Will. It is in the submission to the Will of God and within His commandments that we find joy and can meet the needs and plans of our days. Just as the Psalmist sang of the joy of the Lord on a ten string lyre[13] we too find our ultimate joy in the 10 commandments[14] and the Divine Will. As the Lord Jesus tells us[15] we pray not for our will be done but rather for the Father’s Will to be done. It is the loving Father who can see the future and the needs of the day and desires the best for us[16] today and then and in eternity with Him[17]. So Sanders correctly points out that the best priority and time management comes from following completely the Will of God daily.
    VII. Sanders picks up another key principle in time management in the God centered leader in speaking on the subject of interruptions and distractions. Sanders recognizes that there are time when distractions and interruptions are times when either God wants to use us for His glory, say in witnessing to others, or when God needs us to begin a new task or convey a message to us. Some of the spiritual masters such as St John of the Cross[18], St Theresa of Avila[19] and St Ignatius of Loyola[20] speak of times when a distraction or interruption actually turns out to be an moment when God is giving us a message about Himself or something. It is also true that the evil one[21] can cause distraction and interruption in our lives trying to prevent us from carrying out the Divine plan. Finally we know too that as mere creatures we can cause our own distractions or that in others without any help from God[22] or Satan. That is why great discernment and prayer and a balanced life is needed to carefully gage the situation individually. If we have poorly prepared or have poorly managed our time and not spent quality time encountering the True and Living God in prayer then we will not only not be able to judge the source of the interruption but we may miss an opportunity for grace in our lives or the lives of others.
    VIII. Spiritual leadership is similar and different from temporal leadership in that the spiritual leader must always spend time in prayer constantly in order to know and do the Will of God. We can use the best time management strategies known to man and have ever organizing device there is and if we are not following God’s Holy Will we will be at best ineffective and even a counter productive element in the Kingdom. The only way to know the Divine Will is through constant quality time in prayer[23] and then through the Sacred Scripture and other sources. There will be times when our schedules will be so busy that there is no way to accomplish the task of the day or His mission. While many times that is poor planning on our part occasionally it has been arranged like that by God so that we have to fly to Him in prayer and then we see results that we could not have accomplished without prayer. Prayer time for the leader must be a time that is set in the schedule and preferably the same place each day- such as the early morning[24] before the day begins. A scheduled prayer time and various other scheduled times in the day for a smaller amount of prayer sets up regular appointments with God that He can use to give greater fruit to our work. If we structure our day around our encounters with God in prayer[25] then quickly the rest of our time management issues begin to fade away[26] and we become more productive than before.
    IX. Sanders brings up another important principle in the need the achieve balance in the life of the leader which greatly contributes to increased time management and productivity. I enjoyed the idea of John Wesley who would break his day into five minute segments. I think that if we were to seriously look at the amount of time we spent per day or per week on needless things we could spend more time in service to Him, more time with family, more time in prayer and so on. We each have our temptation which can be too much time on the telephone, the internet, on television, in un important books or in trivial conversation, etc. A good evaluation of time spent on an occasional basis can free up the schedule and the leader just as a good examination of conscience can help free up the soul of the sin and evil taking hold in various areas of the soul. Balance creates harmony and peace and helps the leader and a individual soul to be a more effective child of God and serve Him better. A balanced life with work/ study, prayer, rest, recreation, worship, family, friends are like the even and fair scales spoke about in the Psalm[27]—it is from the Lord and therefore is good.
    X. The final principle which I took from Sanders is a warning for all of us that being to avoid at all costs procrastination. Sanders writes that “procrastination the thief of time, is one of the devil’s most potent weapons for defrauding us of our eternal heritage.”[28] We find God and God’s Will for us in the tasks and duties of the present moment.[29] We need not try to please and serve the Good God tomorrow for that is in Divine Providence for that day that may or may not come. Besides having an awareness of our past sins and short comings and lessons we have committed or learned from in the past we must entrust the past with it’s joys and sorrows with it’s good and evil into Divine Mercy. Today God is present for us at this moment[30] and it is with this realization and for the love of Him Whom we should love above all things and creatures that we can fight the noon day devil of procrastination and avoid the sin of presuming that we can carry out His Will or grow closer to him in the ‘morrow. We are called to be faithful sons and daughters of the Most High today in all of our activities and to all those we meet. In our time management we do the task before us until it is done then if and when the next day comes we move to the next task He sets before us. In a word we are called to be faithful each day. “Work with cheerfulness, with peace, in the presence of God. In this way you will also carry out your task with common sense. You will carry it through to the end. Though tiredness is beating you down, you will finish it off well; and your works will be pleasing to God”[31]
    The Lord Jesus calls us today to do certain tasks for Him. These tasks range from family obligations to work to school to Church and things that to the created eye seem mundane and unimportant yet if we are living within the Divine Will and in a life with the Crucified and Risen One these things can be very important to the mission that He gives us to do. To procrastinate in these daily tasks in many ways is akin to the Lord calling us[32] and for us to come up with a laundry list why we can not and he moves on. The potential disciple is left while the work of the Kingdom goes forward. Procrastination is deadly[33] to the soul[34] and deadly to any leadership position.[35] Constant vigilance must be kept to avoid this and if one falls into the trap to pick up quickly and move on.
    I close with the poem by Robert Herrick[36] which seems to fit well in this paper on the need for time management in Christian leadership and by all followers of Christ. That we may manage our time better so as to serve Him more fully let us pray that He will guide us and assist us in our shortcomings and better take advantage of this gift of time He has granted to us.


    “GATHER ye rosebuds while ye may,
    Old Time is still a-flying:
    And this same flower that smiles to-day
    To-morrow will be dying.

    The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
    The higher he 's a-getting,
    The sooner will his race be run,
    And nearer he 's to setting.

    That age is best which is the first,
    When youth and blood are warmer;
    But being spent, the worse, and worst
    Times still succeed the former.

    Then be not coy, but use your time,
    And while ye may, go marry:
    For having lost but once your prime,
    You may for ever tarry.”


    [1] Ecc 3:1-15
    [2] Jas 4:13-17
    [3] Gen 3:1-5- cf. “…’you will surely not die’ said the serpent…”; also see Gen 11:4; et al.
    [4] Num 15:30-31
    [5] Mt 24:42-51
    [6] Neh 3:1; et al.
    [7] Ez 40-42
    [8] 1 Tim 6:15; et al
    [9] Jn 13:13-16; Jn 18-19; Acts 7:54 8:1; et al.
    [10] Ps 94:19; Ecc 11:10; Philp 2:28; 1 Peter 5:7
    [11] Jn 2:1-12; et al. be patient and diligently pick up our daily crosses and priorities to better fulfill His Will
    [12] Prov 29:20
    [13] Ps 33:2; Ps 92:3; 144:9
    [14] Dt 5:6-21, 6:4-9; et al.
    [15] Mt 6:9-14; et al.
    [16] Mt 6:25-34; et al.
    [17] 2 Jn 1:3; et al.
    [18] “Ascent of Mount Carmel”, “Dark Night of the Soul”, “Spiritual Canticle of the Soul and the Bridegroom Christ”, St. John of the Cross, 1542-1591.
    [19] “Way of Perfection”, “Interior Castle”, St. Theresa of Jesus, 1515-1582.
    [20] “Spiritual Exercises”, St Ignatius of Loyola, 1533.
    [21] 2 Cor 11:14
    [22] Acts 12:7
    [23] Acts 1:14; 2 Thes 1:1; 2 Tim 1:3
    [24] Ps 88:13; Mk 1:35
    [25] Ps 119:64
    [26] Prov 3:5-6
    [27] Ps 16:11
    [28] “Spiritual Leadership: Principles of Excellence for Every Believer”, J. Oswald Sanders, Moody, Chicago, 1994.
    [29] 2 Cor 6:2, Ecc 12:1; Prov 27:1
    [30] Abandonment to Divine Providence, Jean-Pierre de Caussade, S.J. (d. 1751), St. Louis: B. Herder Book Company, 1921
    [31] “The Forge”, # 744, St. Josemaria Escriva, 1902-1975, Scepter Publishing, New York, 1988.
    [32] Lk 9:59-62; Ps 119:60; et al.
    [33] Lk 13:25
    [34] Is 55:6
    [35] Dt 23:21; Ecc 5:4
    [36] “To the Virgins, to make much of Time”, Robert Herrick. 1591–1674
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:26:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    10 Biblical Leaders I Admire

    10 Biblical Leaders I Admire

    Leading off with the number one position would of course have to be the ultimate leader and Shepherd of souls[1] Our Lord Jesus Christ. We see in Christ Jesus leadership which both chastises[2] and heals[3], love which is both tender and tuff, words which bring comfort and which cut like a knife into the soul. We see a leader who inspires the leadership even in those to whom the world would not associate as potential leaders. Our Lord knows the potential for the soul. He knows that there is a time to heal and forgive and a time to chastise and condemn. We see in Jesus Christ who is the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity[4] that yes God is love and love evolves sacrifice at time. Love is also looking for the best of the individual receiving love not just allowing behavior which would lead the person—the soul into destruction. Our Lord shows us that God way of loving the soul (which we are called to emulate) for the long term benefit of the individual not just a short term gain and certainly not for a selfish motive. Love[5] is a verb alas and Christian leadership must be centered always upon love. As we are creatures and just mere images of our Divine Creator we will fall short however we must look to the ultimate example of leadership in Our Lord Jesus Christ to give us the strength and the courage to face our weaknesses and through His grace[6] overcome to become the Christian leaders He calls us to be.
    The next ideal Christian leader for me was a Biblical leader who did not lead a great multitude of people yet through his prayer and example inspired a nation and subsequent generations to turn to God and away from sin and evil. I look to the prophet of God Elijah. Elijah like so many leaders had the role thrust upon him and it frightened him. Facing seemingly insurmountable odds through the grace and mercy of God he defeated the false prophets of Baal and so many others.[7] Elijah comes into town like an old western hired gun for the Lord God of Hosts[8] and once his mission is accomplished realizes the gravity of his situation and retreats to prayer to gain courage and wisdom to fight another day for Him[9]. To myself Elijah shows that the Christian leader will face times when it seems as if the entire world is out against him or her and desires their death yet we turn to The One whom we know can ‘come to our assistance’ and protect us within the shadow of His wings to struggle for the Kingdom another day. Just as Christ Our Lord turned to prayer constantly Elijah also sets the example for us that through prayer to God if we are faithful we can do all things.
    St. Peter[10] is an interesting leader as in by all accounts he was not the most successful fisherman around and he denied Christ yet it was his humility along with the infinite mercy of God that he was still called by Christ to be the rock solid foundation[11] upon which Christ would build Christianity. St Peter shows me that despite our failings and even sins if we beg for mercy and forgiveness and reengage in the struggle to serve that God can accomplish anything He desires in the lives of those who are humble. Alone we are destined to fail and without Jesus Christ we have no hope of temporal success for His Kingdom much less in obtaining salvation and partaking in the Beatific Vision. Through Him and with Him we find the courage and strength to rise up to any task no matter how great. We have only to trust and remain in His love. If we count on our own abilities and become filled with pride we will fall just as St. Peter fell after Our Lord was arrested. Through Christ and in humility we find the ability to accomplish any mission He sets before. The mark of any good Christian leader is humility in recognizing where and from Whom we draw our ability and gifts.
    Christian leadership more than any other type of leadership involves a great amount of trust in God and I feel that one of the Biblical leaders who demonstrated this unwavering trust is Abraham. God calls each of us as Christians and as Christian leaders to face times when we are called to do the seemingly impossible. We are called to do what He wants and we do not always know the reason why. This involves trust and faith in Divine Providence that God will provide the answers and solutions at the moment when we need it the most. Abraham demonstrated that trust when he took his son to the top of the mountain to prepare to offer him in sacrifice to God. Sacred Scripture tells us that God desires Mercy not sacrifice and the son was spared and Abraham proved his faith and trust to God but most importantly to himself and others through the generations. God knew in His infinite wisdom of the faithfulness of Abraham yet Abraham and later generations did not—a test was in order. The Christian leader and each individual Christian will face tests in life of various sorts yet we must have faith and trust in Him[12] Whom we love and serve. God knows of our ability yet we need to under go the test in order to shine more brightly for Him as the fine metal in the furnace. God can not work great things through us without our cooperation, as He will not violate our free will, if we as Christian leaders do not have faith and trust and step into the unknown with Him as Abraham did.
    Within the heart of the successful Christian leader is a hunger for souls to be lead to God also known as apostolic zeal. At root in any real apostolic zeal is the recognition of our complete and total dependence on God and His Mercy despite our past sins and failings and present weaknesses. The Apostle St. Paul demonstrates this recognition of his own weakness and unworthiness and that it is only He Who dwells within that accomplishes the endeavor. Temporal leadership is based on many times our own abilities and accomplishments as I pointed out earlier yet the Christian leader must pour himself out completely to put on the mind of Christ so despite impossible weaknesses or obstacles can through Divine grace accomplish the Will of God.[13]
    Some of the other Biblical leaders that I admire would be St. John the beloved for his absolute love of Christ and the purity of his heart. It is interesting that Christian tradition holds that all the apostles were martyred but one St John. He did suffer in prison and exile and was even boiled yet he was not martyred. Because of his purity and love for Christ he was spared the martyrs death. His example of the love for God should inspire Christian leaders to find refuge within the Heart of Jesus and place our heads upon His breast and draw the courage and comfort needed to lead His flock. It should also serve as an example to Christian leaders of all traditions to seek and strive after purity of heart, mind and body so that in seeing the Face of God we can better witness to His glory to a world in darkness. I would also have to say that Moses would be a favorite Biblical leader in the faith that he demonstrated so many times before during and after the Exodus. Moses too shows a great amount of zeal and a leadership style we need to emulate which is centered on prayer to God Almighty.
    The next Biblical leader that I would identify as one whom I admire would be someone many may not think of –that being the foster father of Our Lord Jesus Christ, St. Joseph[14]. St. Joseph does not speak much in the Sacred Scripture yet he must have been a great leader to be entrusted by God[15] to care for the Divine Child[16] and the Mother of God[17]. I can not imagine the great faith that he had to be able to accept that this child that his betrothed wife had was from God even when sent an angelic messenger[18]. He demonstrated great trust in God though he did not know all the answers. He was given the responsibility to protect the child Jesus by fleeing into Egypt[19] and throughout His early formative years. Good parents are the best Christian leaders and St. Joseph must have been a very good father and leader to be given the call to be the foster father of Jesus Christ. St. Joseph to me also demonstrates that to the humble and the obedient God can bring about great miracles. He faced his Divinely given duty with great prudence and with an unwavering trust in the Wisdom and Providence of God. To me St. Joseph models what Christian leaders and parents should follow in an unshakable faith and obedience to the call of God regardless if we do not know the reason why –now.
    I would close out my list of ten leaders with ‘The Forerunner’, St John the Baptist. St John the Baptist knew that he was just a creature called through grace for a mission and that he was unimportant compared to the One who would follow[20]. St John demonstrated the courage to leave all behind in worldly allurements for the sake of proclaiming the coming of the Messiah. St. John just like the earlier prophet Jeremiah became a pillar of brass and a wall of iron[21] to withstand the attacks of the world so as to proclaim the Day of the Lord with zeal and fervor. In a simple way he knew his mission and Whom he served and did not care about the consequences or the opinions of others. Once he had fulfilled his mission he quickly stepped down from his position as the center of attention to give glory and honor to the Lamb of God[22]. He like the other leaders mentioned was faithful to the end. Christian leaders must recognize that we at best are temporary servants entrusted to a specific mission for a specific time and The One Who called us is more important that we are. We need to pray to be obedient enough that when it is our time to hand over the reigns of leadership to others that we will do so out of love for Christ and the sake of the Gospel which we proclaim. We may not be called to survive on locust and honey[23] but we are called to reject the world and it’s entrapments for the sake of Christ and announces to the world the Salvific action of Jesus Christ regardless of the cost[24].
    10 Biblical leaders each with different missions and in different times yet through love of God they changed the course of human history in many ways. If we remain faithful and love God above all else then we too can in some small way model the leadership of these ten in the mission He gives us today.
    [1] Jn 10:10-15; et al.
    [2] Mt 21:12-17; et al.
    [3] Mt 14:34-36; et al.
    [4] Gen 1:26; Mt 28:19
    [5] Rom 8:39; Eph 2:4; 1 Jn 3:1; 1 Jn 3:10; 1 Jn 4:8; et al.
    [6] Ps 84:12; Lk 1:28; Jn 1: 16; Rom 1:7; 1 Cor 16:23; 2 Cor 1:12; Gal 5:4; Heb 13:9; Jas 4:6; Mt 26:26-28; Mk 14: 22-24; Lk 22: 19; Jn 6; 1 Cor 10: 16; 11: 24, 27,29
    [7] 1 Kings 18
    [8] 1 Kings 18:39-40
    [9] 1 Kings 19:3-18
    [10] Jn 1:42
    [11] Mt 10:2; Mt 16:18-19; Lk 22:32; Jn 21:17; Acts 21:14; Gal 1:18; Is 22:20-23
    [12] Heb 2:5-18
    [13] Col 1:24:29
    [14] Mt 1:16; et al.
    [15] Mt 1:19
    [16] Is 9:5-6; Jn 1:1; Jn 8:58-59; Jn 20:28; Rev 1:8; Rev 22:13
    [17] Mt 1: 20-24; Mt 27:56; Lk 1:28,38,42, 48; Lk 2:35; Acts 19:11-12; Phil 3:17; 1 Tim 2:1; Rev 5:1-8; Ps 136; et al.
    [18] Lk 1:26-28; Mt 1:18-24; et al.
    [19] Mt 2:19-23; et al.
    [20] Jn 1:19-34
    [21] Jer 1:16-19
    [22] Gen 22:8; Jn 1:29, 36; Rev 5:6, 7:10, 7:15
    [23] Mt 3:4-6; et al.
    [24] Mt 10:26-39; Mt 16:24-28; et al.
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:22:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink


    “Spiritual Administration Vs. Spiritual Leadership: Beans, Bullets and Bad-guys”

    “Spiritual Administration Vs. Spiritual Leadership: Beans, Bullets and Bad-guys”


    In examining the differences between the gifts of leadership and administration I reflected on my time in the Marine Corps and the role of the tactician/ field commander and the role of the logistician/ echelon commander. Both roles are vital in the implementation of war fighting strategies and battlefield success. Both roles have cross over duties which are applicable to the other yet radically different in their approach and short range mission objectives. However, though short range mission objectives and tasks are different they both work towards the same long range overall mission objective. Similarly the leader as defined by Hocking[1], et al, fulfills more of the field commander role (tactician) in the still very real spiritual war within his/ her area of charge. The logistician conversely would fulfill the role of administrator in the spiritual battles[2] which the Church engages in.
    As a Marine one of the many acronyms which we had to memorize in regards to battle preparation what “BBB” “Beans, Bullets and Bad-guys”[3]. The leader and the administrator even to a higher degree must take into consideration the three B’s of logistics to help the local Church better fight the spiritual battles which rage around (and occasionally within) Her.
    The shepherd must be concerned not only with the long range mission objective, i.e. guiding the souls under his/ her charge into the safe harbor of the Beatific Vision and bringing a greater harvest of souls along with them but also with the logistics of guiding the flock through the daily rocky shoals that come up. Shepherds must be concerned with the temporal and spiritual needs of the flock that Our Lord has entrusted to them always mindful of the fact that they are but mere stewards of the souls today and that the Almighty One is the ultimate and eternal commander. So borrowing from the acronym I mentioned previously the “beans” that the shepherd must be concerned with is if his/ her flock is being cared for temporally (physically and emotionally). Are there members of the local Church in need? Has someone suffered hardships and needs the support of the shepherd and or the flock in general? Does the individual soul or family need support to deal with loss or emotional issues? These questions and potential problems not only effect the short range effectiveness and vitality of the local Church but if not treated can lead to spiritual ramifications in which the soul(s) leave the flock and could fall victim to the wolves in the non Christian world. The administrator would be concerned for the logistical issues with the “beans” however so should the leader- both have a responsibility to God as shepherds and as Christians to feed the poor, cloth the naked and give comfort to the afflicted.[4]
    The shepherd must be concerned with basic war fighting[5] strategies and give his/ her flock the tools (the “bullets”) to engage the enemy who after all is a master strategist though he is the father of lies. The battle as St Paul tells us is ‘not one of flesh and blood’ (though history does show in the blood of the martyrs that a pound of flesh is exacted from the Bride of Christ occasionally) ‘but of principalities and powers’[6]. The “bullets” then that we Christians use and must be trained to use are the sword of the Spirit (which is the Word of God) and our prayers. In treating the use of prayer as a potent weapon I remember the axiom of praying for our enemies and to pray unceasingly. We study the Word of God and we constantly spend regular time in prayer so that when God needs to use us we are prepared. As the archer prepares the arrows[7] to be used at just the proper time so to do we study the Divine Word and encounter God in prayer while constantly rending our hearts to remove impurities and sin so that we too may be one of those polished arrows that the Almighty One places in His quiver. The shepherd be they gifted with leadership or administration must therefore move “Dei populus”[8] (“God’s people”) into a constant state of conversion where by they study with greater zeal and pray with greater love so that they may be ready at anytime to engage the enemy of souls. The leader in this aspect would be concerned with the vision of the faith community and in achieving the marked goals set forth. The leader must be just as concerned with the individual progression of a soul as with the spiritual objectives of the people God has gathered for Himself. Conversely the administrator keeping in mind the overall mission must be concerned with the daily operation of the Christian community/ individual soul to guarantee that the mission is not compromised due to mismanagement of the seemingly mundane details. Both roles are vital in the operation of the community and in the stewardship of the souls under his/ her charge[9]. The leader might have programs or initiatives while the administrator would handle the task management of one or many programs. One gift it seems builds upon the other and visa versa.
    Lest we forget who is the enemy[10] and the potential tragic consequences[11] of our failure to exercise the gift of administration or leadership we must constantly remind ourselves of the very serious nature of the mission before us. Far too frequently the person gifted with administration can fall into the trap set by the evil one of over management and single minded task orientated administration and fail to set vision for the flock entrusted to him/ her. Administration with out the constant influx of vision from the Eternal One is simply basic business management as one would see in the secular world. The administrator focuses so much on the tasks of daily administration that he/ she fails to shepherd. Ministry quickly becomes a business and lack the flowing fire of the Holy Spirit which emblazes the soul to new possibilities in evangelization and the Divine vision for the community. This over administration by the person gifted by administration can manifest it self in what Segundo Galilea refers[12] to as the demon of activism[13] and is dangerous to the soul of the minister and the flock entrusted to him/ her. On more of a psychological/ spiritual perspective the activism takes root in the perfectionism and false pride[14] of the individual. The evil one who Christian tradition tells us personally tempts each soul strikes at the soul of the administrator burying them in meetings/ tasks and paperwork. Eventually though the administrator is successful in his or her business affairs the sin of a false pride creeps in and then lacking the Divine vision tasks and souls that were under the charge of the minister gifted with administration begin to fall like leaves from an autumn tree. Even skilled business administration lacking the Divine infusion pales in comparison to Divinely infused administration which transforms souls, organizations and individual Churches. We do not need another skilled business administrator in the Christian world but Divinely infused administrators who are connected to the quiet movements[15] of the Holy Spirit.
    Conversely the leader must be ever vigilant to not under manage or over delegate tasks to others with only vision for the community in mind. While the minister gifted with leadership may have great vision for a community and can delegate tasks they must always insure that projects are met in detail through periodic examinations and reevaluations. Many a battle has been lost by leaders with great battle skills and vision yet without the needed logistical support in the day to day operation of the battle force. Battles and wars are won through strategic vision and planning and in strategic logistics one without the other leads inevitably to the loss of troops. In the case of the spiritual warfare[16] which the minister and all Christians fight the loss of troops is the loss of souls. The minister gifted with spiritual leadership falls and causes other souls to fall in this instance through a ‘demon of messianism’[17] in which vision becomes one of what the individual minister desires and not what the Holy Will deigns for the community. Again the root of this false and fatal spirit finds itself in pride[18] and in the lack of prudence and discernment on the part of the minister. It is a very easy trap to fall into for any Christian leader and one should not be overly critical when the minister steps into this trap[19]. The counter balance for this is similar to the counter balance for the administrator prayer, detachment and examination of the daily operation of the ministry short term objectives.
    I am increasingly becoming aware that regardless of the special gift given by God to the minister be it in administration or leadership that the minister must constantly pray for an increase[20] in the gifts of the Holy Spirit[21] that are available in superabundance[22] to all Christians. Gifts and fruits such as discernment, prudence, patience, self control ect must be increased and fully activated to help the minister better use the other gifts.
    In relation to the question regarding if the administrator/ leader can carry out the task of the other my simple answer is yes with a condition. The minister regardless of which gift they have must exercise that gift and build upon it using those seven gifts of the Holy Spirit[23] which I touched upon in the previous paragraph. The minister must further challenge his or her self to recognize the areas of potential weakness[24] and use the tools which God provides[25]. Just as the Lord Jesus speaks of in the parable of the talents[26] we too as His faithful servants must build upon the gifts which we have been given so to bring glory to the King and His Kingdom. So, the administrator must first and foremost be a person of deep prayer[27] and grounded in Sacred Scripture[28] and also build up leadership traits even through secular education opportunities. Similarly the leader must be a person of prayer[29] and the Word and build up upon areas of weakness in administration skills to better guide the flock or ministry entrusted to them[30]. God many times I have found gives us tools to use that can work for His Glory that we might have other wise dismissed so that His Kingdom can be built up and His Will be manifested in others[31]. Very often the answer to the problem is before us if we only pray that we are open to the opportunities[32] with the eyes of faith.[33] Therefore, we must pray unceasingly for an increase of faith, hope and love that regardless if we have been given the gift of administration, leadership or any of the other gifts that we can bring back a bounty of souls before the Throne of God. For alas the only reward for the Christian leader or the Christian administrator should be the words of Our Merciful Savior on the final day- “'Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful…”![34]




    “Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest Come, Holy Spirit, Creator blest,And in our souls take up your rest;Come with your grace and heavenly aidTo fill the hearts which you have made.O Comforter, to you we cry,O heavenly gift of God Most High,O fount of life and fire of love,And sweet anointing from above.You in your sevenfold gifts are known;You, finger of God's hand we own;You, promise of the Father, youWho do the tongue with power imbue.Kindle our senses from above,And make our hearts o'erflow with love;With patience firm and virtue highThe weakness of our flesh supply.Far from us drive the foe we dread,And grant us your peace instead;So shall we not, with you for guide,Turn from the path of life aside.Oh, may your grace on us bestowThe Father and the Son to know;And you, through endless times confessed,Of both the eternal Spirit blest.Now to the Father and the Son,Who rose from death, be glory given,With you, O holy Comforter,Henceforth by all in earth and heaven. Amen.” [35]
    [1] Class handout, p. 8-12, taken from David Hocking, “Be a leader people follow”, Glendale, Regal Books, 1979
    [2] 1 Cor 2:10-16, 2 Cor 10:3-6
    [3] ‘Combat Orders’, United States Marine Corps, Leatherneck 2007, USMC Officer Training Manuel, item 4 (a), Quantico; et al.
    [4] Mt 25:33-46; Mt 22: 37-40; et al.
    [5] 2 Cor 10:3-6: “On the Priesthood”, St John Chrysostom, Book IV, A.D. 347-407; et al
    [6] Eph 6:10-17
    [7] Ps 45:5-8; Ps 7:8
    [8] 1 Peter 2:9-10
    [9] Gen 18:19
    [10] “On the power of demons”, Homilies I-III, St John Chrysostom, A.D. 347-407
    [11] Gal 4:4-11
    [12] “Temptation and Discernment”, Segundo Galilea, ICS Publications, 1996, Washington DC.
    [13] Ibid, p. 25-26
    [14] James 4:6-10, Ps 73
    [15] 1 Kings 19:9-13
    [16] “The Spiritual Combat”, Lorenzo Scupoli, Sophia Institute Press, original publication 1589; “Spiritual Combat Revisited”, Jonathon Robinson, Ignatius Press, 2003
    [17] “Temptation and Discernment”, p. 23-24
    [18] James 4:6-10, Ps 73
    [19] Heb 10:32,35-39
    [20] Lk 11:13
    [21] 1 Cor 14; 1 Cor 12;
    [22] 2 Cor 4:7-18
    [23] “On the Holy Spirit”, “Book II”, St. Ambrose, A.D. 340-397; “On the Holy Spirit”, St Gregory of Nysa, circa A.D. 385;
    [24] 2 Cor 13:4-9
    [25] Heb 6:7-8
    [26] Mt 25:14-30
    [27] Philp 4:4-9
    [28] James 1:22-25, Ps 119:105-112
    [29] Philp 4:4-9
    [30] 2 Tim 4:1-5; Philp 1:27
    [31] Mt 19:26
    [32] James 2:17-20
    [33] Mt 9:29
    [34] Mt 25:21,23
    [35] “Veni Creator Spiritus”, attributed to Rabanus Maurus, A.D. 776-856. (A traditional Pentecost hymn.)
  • |
    10/20/2006 08:16:00 PM :: 0 comments ::

    Ed Working :: permalink